You know how it goes… you’ve been fighting off a cold without much success, and then on the third day you wake up with a voice that’s barely-there: raspy, pitchy and strained. (Of course, this usually happens on the day you have a big presentation or important meeting, right?)

Hoarseness, though frustrating and uncomfortable, is typically not a serious symptom. Also, important to note: it’s not a disease in and of itself. Many cases tend to resolve on their own without medical intervention. However, some cases do need to be seen by an ENT physician. Specialists at ENT Clinic of Utah – with locations in Magna and West Valley City, UT – frequently see patients for hoarseness and related symptoms. In this blog post, we’ll cover some of the questions we frequently get about losing your voice.

What causes hoarseness?

The most common causes tend to be the common cold, allergies, viral infections in the upper respiratory tract, and using your voice too loudly or for a prolonged period. However, hoarseness may also be caused by:

  • Smoking
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)
  • Thyroid issues
  • Neurological disorders
  • Rheumatoid arthritis

What can you do for a hoarse voice?

Your hoarse voice will usually resolve itself through rest. Take a “quiet day,” and speak as little as possible, allowing the vocal cords some recovery time. While whispering might seem like an intuitive solution, this behavior can actually put further strain on your voice; if you have to communicate, use pen and paper. If your hoarseness is caused by smoking, talk to your doctor about developing a smoking cessation plan. Lastly, keep drinking plenty of fluids, and consider running a humidifier in your home (especially at night in the bedroom).

Though uncommon, hoarseness may be caused by nodules or polyps, which may require surgery.

How long will it take for my voice to come back?

A lost voice may come back in just two or three days when hoarseness is caused by a cold or overuse. If hoarseness is caused by laryngitis or other more complex illnesses, it may take a couple weeks for your voice to regain its former strength.

Every patient and case is different. If you are concerned about your hoarseness, see an ENT doctor near you for an evaluation and diagnosis. A throat specialist may diagnose hoarseness by…

  • Asking questions about your symptoms.
  • Examining the voice box and throat with a mirror or laryngoscope.
  • Listening to the sound of your voice and breath.
  • Ordering one or more lab tests, including biopsy or x-ray.

See an ENT Doctor Near You for Hoarseness

If you are experiencing hoarseness, schedule an appointment with an ENT doctor near you. Call 801-912-8270. ENT Clinic of Utah has locations in West Valley City and Magna, UT.

Behind heart disease (#1) and arthritis (#2), hearing loss is the third most common health problem in the United States, affecting approximately 48 million adults. As the American Academy of Audiology points out, hearing loss doesn’t just affect “old” people. Half of those with hearing loss are younger than age 65. Furthermore, the issue is gaining traction in our youngest patients; approximately one in eight children ages 6-19 has noise-induced hearing loss.

What is the cause of hearing loss?

There are many possible causes of hearing loss, which is why any kind of hearing loss should be evaluated by a specialist. At ENT Clinic of Utah, specialists evaluate and diagnose hearing loss in the context of the whole person. This is important as hearing loss is sometimes associated with other health conditions, which may not necessarily be identified when pursuing hearing loss treatment through other avenues. Possible causes of hearing loss may include:

  • Risk of hearing loss increases with age for reasons that are not fully understood. It is believed that decades of noise exposure eventually leads to wear on the body’s different systems involved in hearing.
  • Individuals who work in noisy occupations may be more likely to experience hearing loss. Even brief exposure to noise can have a permanent impact on hearing.
  • Many medications can lead to hearing loss, including some antibiotics, chemotherapy drugs, erectile dysfunction drugs and aspirin (among others). Talk to your doctor about possible side effects associated with the drugs you are taking.
  • Some chronic diseases, such as heart disease, diabetes and hypertension, can lead to hearing loss. Ménière’s disease (an inner ear disorder) is another illness known to contribute to hearing loss.
  • Head impact – from sports, a vehicle accident or violence – can lead to hearing loss, especially if the eardrum is punctured.
  • Lastly, ear infections can lead to temporary or permanent hearing loss in some situations.

Diagnosing and treating hearing loss can be complex. An ENT doctor near you may be able to reduce future hearing loss and help you regain your hearing with hearing aids.

Where can I get a hearing loss test?

You can undergo a hearing loss test by visiting an ENT doctor near you. One benefit of going to an ENT doctor (as opposed to an audiologist) is that ENT specialists take a holistic view in treating hearing loss. Consider seeing an ENT for hearing loss testing and treatment – especially if you have known medical issues and/or other symptoms related to the ears or sinuses.

See an ENT Doctor Near You

For more information about your hearing loss management options, schedule an appointment with an ENT in Magna or West Valley City. Call 801-912-8270.

“Dizziness,” which may present differently from person to person, is a term patients and health care providers may use to describe feelings of faintness, unsteadiness and vertigo (the disorienting sense that your surroundings are spinning). Dizziness can be very uncomfortable and disruptive to your daily routine, which is why many people who experience multiple or regular episodes of dizziness seek professional care.

Why see an ENT for dizziness?

If you see your primary care provider for dizziness, you may be referred to a specialist, depending upon your doctor’s observations and evaluation. Some patients are referred to an ear, nose and throat (ENT) specialist for more advanced diagnosis and treatment. ENT doctors are trained in treating diseases and disorders that affect the inner ear, which is often associated with dizziness, vertigo and imbalance.

What causes dizziness?

There are several possible causes of dizziness. In many cases, people who experience dizziness suffer from vertigo, which occurs when the inner ear attempts to reconcile confused signals with sensory input from the eyes and body. Other causes of dizziness related to the inner ear include:

  • Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV)
  • Infection
  • Ménière’s disease
  • Migraine

Dizziness may also be caused by a drop in blood pressure, poor circulation, neurological disorders (including Parkinson’s and multiple sclerosis), some medications, dehydration, anxiety, anemia and low blood sugar. Because there are so many possible causes of dizziness, it’s important to see a physician for an evaluation if you frequently experience dizzy episodes.

What tests should I have if I get dizzy?

During your ENT appointment, your physician will ask you about your symptoms, what medications you are taking, and a medical history. A physical examination may also be performed at this time. An ENT doctor may test your hearing, vision and balance with some simple in-office tests. A CT scan or MRI may be necessary in some cases, but not all.

What treatments are there for dizziness?

Dizziness treatment will depend on the cause of dizziness and your symptoms. Some patients may benefit from medications, including diuretics, certain antihistamines, anti-nausea medications and other drugs.

Head position maneuvers, balance therapy and psychotherapy are a few of the non-pharmaceutical options that may be available. Lastly, some patients may elect to have antibiotic gentamicin injections or surgery to disable balance function in the inner ear that is causing dizziness. In these cases, the other inner ear takes over balance function.

See an ENT Doctor Near You for Dizziness

Do you experience dizziness on a regular basis? Consider scheduling an appointment with an ENT doctor near you by calling 801-912-8270. ENT Clinic of Utah serves patients throughout the Salt Lake City area with locations in Magna and West Valley City, UT.

Did you know that while the average adult has two to four colds per year, children may have as many as 12 colds per year? Common symptoms can include congestion, coughing, sneezing, fever, muscle ache, and, of course, the all-too-familiar and inconvenient symptom of a runny nose.

What causes a runny nose? What should I do?

Before you try to cure a runny nose, it’s important to figure out what’s causing the issue.

  • If allergens are causing your runny nose, then a simple over-the-counter antihistamine may be all you need to treat the symptom. Additional steps you can take include vacuuming and dusting your home, bathing pets to remove dander, moving houseplants out of the home, and using an air purifier and/or HEPA air filters in your home. If symptoms continue to persist through more than one season, consider seeing an ENT doctor near you for allergy testing.
  • Stress and Lifestyle. Stress and lack of sleep can actually lead to illness, including runny nose. If you’ve been overdoing it lately, consider taking some time to rest and re-center. Get a good night’s sleep, drink plenty of fluids, and make sure you’re consuming a healthy diet that’s rich in fruit and vegetables.
  • Common Cold. If your runny nose is caused by a common cold, drink plenty of fluids and give your body time to rest. Your immune system is fighting off infection and needs all the help it can get to flush germs from the nose and sinuses via mucus.

How do you stop a runny nose?

Most of the time, a runny nose does not require any medical intervention. The best course of action is usually to get plenty of rest, drink lots of fluids, and give your body time to heal itself. There are many over-the-counter medications for adults and children that can help alleviate runny nose and associated symptoms. Ask your local pharmacist for more information.

Note that antibiotics are not an appropriate therapy for a runny nose in most situations, as antibiotics are typically not effective in treating the germs causing a runny nose. In addition to being ineffective, the use of antibiotics can increase the chances of needing more expensive or more complex antibiotics later in life for treating other illnesses. Only use antibiotics for a cold when prescribed by your physician (typically for a case of sinus infection).

When should you see a doctor for a cold?

If the cold does not improve or resolve within about two weeks, you may wish to see an ENT specialist near you for an evaluation. Other symptoms that may prompt seeing a doctor include:

  • Lightheadedness / feeling faint
  • Feeling confused / disoriented
  • Vomiting
  • Shortness of breath
  • Cough for 10+ days
  • Chest pain/pressure
  • Persistent, high fever

Schedule With an ENT Doctor In Magna or West Valley City

Schedule an appointment with an ENT near you by calling 801-912-8270. Providers offer diagnostic and therapeutic care for the common cold, sinus infection and more in Magna and West Valley City.

Nothing’s more annoying than a stuffy, congested nose. Sinus pressure, mouth breathing, a raw nose… it’s hard to pick which symptoms are the most uncomfortable! If you’re experiencing nasal congestion, take a quick look at this FAQ from our team at ENT Clinic of Utah. If symptoms persist, come see us at one of our clinics in Magna or West Valley City.

How do you relieve sinus pressure?

Sinus pressure occurs when the nasal passages become inflamed and produce increased mucus levels as they attempt to flush out the irritant. While this natural process is helpful, it certainly isn’t comfortable. Here are a few things you can do at home to relieve sinus pressure, whether caused by a cold or allergies:

  • Drink plenty of fluids
  • Breathe steam (in the shower or over a pot of heated water)
  • Sleep with your head propped up
  • Use a nasal saline spray
  • Use a humidifier

How do I treat a cold?

In addition to trying some of the above techniques, try to get plenty of rest when you have a cold. Your body needs the down time so that your immune system can fight off the cold.

If your nasal congestion is accompanied by a sore throat, try gargling some saltwater. A quarter to half-teaspoon of salt stirred into a warm glass of water can provide much-needed relief. Other helpful remedies:

  • Acetaminophen or ibuprofen to reduce achiness
  • Vaporizer to humidify the air
  • Over-the-counter cough medications to ease symptoms

How long does congestion last?

Nasal congestion may linger for about a week. With proper rest and at-home care, symptoms may pass sooner. It may be time to see a physician if…

  • Congestion lasts for more than a week
  • Fever develops and lasts for several days despite conventional at-home treatment
  • Nasal discharge is yellow or green and causing sinus pain

“Why am I always congested?”

If you are frequently or chronically congested, but not “sick,” consider seeing an ENT doctor near you for an evaluation. Ear, nose and throat doctors are specially trained to evaluate symptoms and explore possible causes of chronic congestion. Many patients at ENT Clinic of Utah have found answers – and relief – by working with our clinic. If you are constantly congested and tired of living with a stuffy nose, come see us at ENT Clinic of Utah in Magna or West Valley City, UT.

Schedule With an ENT Doctor In Magna or West Valley City

Schedule an appointment with an ENT doctor near you by calling 801-912-8270. Treatment for nasal congestion and stuffy nose is available.

Continuing Medical Education Programs
Cardiovascular Disease Management: A Case-Based Approach, 4th Annual Symposium

Richard R. Heuser, M.D., FACC, Program Director
October 13 & 14, 2016: Arizona Biltmore Hotel, Phoenix, Arizona

Register Online & View Brochure

Download the Informational Flier

This two-day continuing education symposium will center on the nuts and bolts of everyday care for patients with cardiovascular diseases, and present new ideas for tailoring the most appropriate treatment plan for each individual. Focus will be placed on gauging and monitoring therapy, including recognizing symptoms, evaluating risk factors, guiding treatment through imaging, general and functional testing, and appropriate therapy. Unlike most programs, this will be delivered as a case based program. In other words, how would I manage a diabetic patient with these lipid levels? Case examples make the lectures more relevant to everyday practitioners.

Promedica International is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. Promedica Internationl designates this live activity for a maximum of 12.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Complimentary registration is available for IASIS Healthcare employees.

Click here to register

Affiliated IASIS Healthcare Providers

Physicians affiliated with IASIS Healthcare receive a reduced registration rate of $495 and can register online, click here.

symposium-banner

Continuing Medical Education Programs
Cardiovascular Disease Management: A Case-Based Approach, 3rd Annual Symposium
Richard R. Heuser, M.D., FACC, Program Director
October 1-2, 2015: Arizona Biltmore Hotel, Phoenix, Arizona
Register Online & View Brochure:

This two-day continuing education symposium will center on the nuts and bolts of everyday care for patients with cardiovascular diseases, and present new ideas for tailoring the most appropriate treatment plan for each individual. Focus will be placed on gauging and monitoring therapy, including recognizing symptoms, evaluating risk factors, guiding treatment through imaging, general and functional testing, and appropriate therapy. Unlike most programs, this will be delivered as a case based program. In other words, how would I manage a diabetic patient with these lipid levels? Case examples make the lectures more relevant to everyday practitioners.

Promedica International is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Promedica Internationl designates this live activity for a maximum of 13.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

IASIS Healthcare employees:
Complimentary registration is available.

Affiliated IASIS Healthcare Providers:
Physicians affiliated with IASIS Healthcare receive a reduced registration rate of $495 and can register online.

View Dr. Heuser’s bio page.

Orthopedic surgeon and Sports Medicine specialist, Andrew Cooper, MD performed surgery to repair a meniscus tear on RSL defender Chris Schuler.  It is anticipated that Chris will be out of action for four to six weeks.  Dr. Cooper has served as the team physician for REAL Salt Lake since 2005.  He practices at Comprehensive Orthopedics & Sports Medicine with locations in Salt Lake City and Sandy. Read more about this.

The Salt Lake Senior Clinic has moved to a new space in the Medical Office Building on the campus of Salt Lake Regional Hospital. Their new address is:
82 South 1100 East, Suite 403.

Please note that their phone number changed in recent months to: 801-505-5299.

Two Practices Join Rocky Mountain Women’s Health Center
Rocky Mountain Women’s Health Center now offers patients three convenient locations to receive their care. Salt Lake Regional Women’s Center and Copper Canyon Women’s Center have become part of Rocky Mountain Women’s Health Center. Connie Perkins will manage RMWHC-Salt Lake Campus and RMWHC-West Valley Campus. Suzette Beristain has become the manager for RMWHC-Davis Campus.

CORE and AOS Combine
Associates in Orthopaedic Surgery have joined CORE to combine the two groups’ expertise to offer a comprehensive range of Orthopedic and Sports Medicine services at two locations. The AOS practice has become CORE-West Valley.

Urology Practices Merge
Doctor Parkinson and Hibbert have also combined under one practice name – Urology Specialists of Utah, with locations on both the Jordan Valley Medical Center campus and on the campus of Pioneer Valley Hospital. They have combined their websites into one at UrologyUtah.com.

General Surgery Joins Forces Under One Name
Our two General Surgery practices are now one, under the practice name, Specialty Surgery of Utah. The practice now offers two locations with six providers including: Dinhkim Le, MD, Kristopher Mitchell, MD, Catherine Beck, MD, Anne Kieryn, MD, Jeffrey Eakin, MD and Tracy Syddall, PA-C. A new website will be launched for this practice in the fall.